The Many Names Of Perilla Oil

It is a fact that the names we address something as,other might not necessarily address them with the same, the same is with Perilla natural oil, the amazing oil has many names…and even many more benefits.

The many names of Perilla being –

  • Ao Shiso
  • Beefsteak plant
  • Ji Soo
  • Perilla
  • Purple Perilla
  • Shiso
  • Wild basil
  • Wild red basil
  • Chinese basil
  • Purple mint
  • Rattlesnake weed
  • Summer coleus

Perilla smells funny, which is no wonder since you will usually find it in cow pastures. Rub leaves on your skin and clothes on hikes to repel ticks. Also a good companion plant for tomatoes. Harvest before seeds form, very invasive if allowed to seed.

It is native to E. Asia, it is a traditional crop of China, India, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and other Asian countries. Perilla was brought to the United States in the late 1800s by Asian immigrants.It has quickly naturalized and become a common weed of pastures and roadsides in the southeastern United States. Found growing in sunny open fields, roadsides, waste places and open woodlands.

Annual herb. It is a very aromatic plant, with a strong minty smell. Growing up to 4 feet tall when in bloom, the stems are square, reddish-purple and branching. The leaves are large, up to 6 in. in diameter, petioled, opposite, ovate and serrate, edges ruffled or curly, dark green tinted red to purple (especially on the underside) and hairy. Sometimes the leaves are so large and red that they remind one of a slice of raw beef, hence the name beefsteak plant. The flower spikes are long, up to 10 in. and born in the leaf axils.

Flowers are small about 1/4-inch long and tubular, pink to lavender and numerous. After blooming from July to October, they leave their calyx on the spike to cover the seed pod, shake the dry seed stalks and it rattles like a rattlesnake. That’s how the plant got one of its common names (rattlesnake weed). Perilla is often confused with purple Basil and used for the same purposes. Gather the edible tender leaves from the plant tops anytime. Gather entire plant in bloom and dry for later use.

Okay now have a look at our reference links…

  1. Perilla Oil by Livestrong
  2. Perilla Oil by Blog
  3. Perilla Seeds by Buzzle